Where to Find Our Favorite Miami Empanadas

Photo via  Culture Crusaders .

New York has pizza, New Orleans has Gumbo, Miami has… empanadas.

From Spain to South America, empanadas are a rich part of Latin American culture. And nicknamed ‘The Capitol of Latin America’, in Miami is no different. Though each country’s version will vary slightly, they all have one thing in common – warm, delicious, stuffed-pastries. Mhmm, I can just smell them now.

It is for this glorious day that is National Empanada Day (April 8th) that we have highlighted some of our favorite places to get the perfect pastry.

ALL DAY.

Bordering on the cusp of downtown, sets the most perfectly curated café, All Day. Home to one of the best cups of coffee our city has to offer, All Day sources locally, serving us breakfast and lunch every day of the week. Filled with treats from Zak the Baker and Salty Donut, their pastry case is solid, but it’s their homemade plantain, queso and ham empanada that gets us every time. You can’t not order one. You just can’t.

EMPANADA HARRY’S.

From Venezuela, Argentina, Colombia, Chile, and Peru, Empanada Harry’s has all the traditional flavors of empanadas you could ever hope for. In their efforts to create a modern bakery, Empanada Harry’s offers select wine and beer creating that gastropub feel. And with a rotating menu of over 30 empanadas, there’s always a reason to come back.

Photo via  Culture Crusaders .

SUR EMPANADAS AND SUBS.

With over a dozen different flavors, SUR delivers some of the tastiest empanadas Little Haiti has to offer. Family owned and made fresh every day, dining at SUR almost feels like you’ve walked into your mother’s kitchen.

SERGIO’S.

A name so representative of Miami’s Cuban culture and cuisine, this beloved local staple isn’t known for their empanadas right off the bat. But in the early 80s, they made a splash when they became the first Cuban franchise to bake theirs instead of fry them for a healthier, more flavorful alternative. Today, Sergio’s sells more empanadas than any of their competitors on the market.

FIORITO.

Owned and operated by two brothers, Maximiliano and Cristian Alvarez, Fiorito is an ode to their culture and childhood. With Argentinian, Spanish and Italian influences, the menu is as vast as it is traditional. Our favorite? The traditional Argentinian corn and cheese empanada.

Photo via  Culture Crusaders .

FUFI’S EMPANADAS.

When Florencia Anaya began bringing in her homemade empanadas for lunch at her job at Smith & Wollensky, she had no idea she was taking the first step at creating her own brand. Six years later, and Fufi’s empanadas were in demand in cafes and kitchens throughout Miami. Today, Fufi’s Empanadas can be found in pop-up events, markets and cafes around the city, like Vice City Bean, Mima Market, Cream Parlor and Stash House Market. Our advice? Try the Grass-Fed Steak in Malbec or Mushrooms with caramelized onions and goat cheese. You really can’t go wrong.

DOGGI’S.

What began as a hot dog stand, almost a decade ago, has transformed into the Venezuelan Arepa Bar, Doggis. Offering a wide variety of arepas, Doggi’s also makes some of our favorite traditional-Venezuelan empanadas, like their pabellon, domino, and carne molida. We’d say they’ve come a long way from the hotdog stand days.

BUNBURY.

Okay, so if you like empanadas (which you obviously do because you just cannot stop reading this article) and you haven’t been to Bunbury, then have you really lived? With decadent combinations like Goat Cheese and Ratatouille, Braised Lamb and Four Cheese and Bacon, you’ll think you’ve died and gone to empanada heaven.

Photo via  Culture Crusaders .
Katy Prohira